Tag Archives: woven wraps

The star-crossed lovers come together at last

In May 2012 we listed one of our early Collections – 3 different patterns all woven in ecru on a deep purple warp, we called the wraps and ring slings ‘Juliet’. Here we provide some insight into the Collection journey and development over the past four years, up to our current designs.
Rand-J

Japanese Knot Juliet and Rei Romeo, 2013

Later the following year we decided to expand on the theme and created a ‘Romeo’ warp of deep, slate blue. We added in different colour weft yarns to each warp and named the new colourways according to Romeo & Juliet’s friends and family, anything on the Juliet warp would have a name relating to House Capulet, and anything from the Romeo warp relating to House Montague.
Continue reading

Sea Island Cotton Review

Review by Super Awesome Babywearing Collective
Re-blogged from Emily here: SAB Collective
Review of Japanese Knot Ooki Zen: 50% Sea Island Cotton, 50% Organic Combed Cotton
This wrap was released in June 2015 and was our very first Boutique piece woven with Sea Island Cotton. Now we have a new Boutique Collection, which showcases exclusive designs and blends including, for the first time, 100% Sea Island Cotton wraps. Keep a look out for reviews of these to come. You can view the boutique collection here.

SICtop2How do I love thee, let me count the ways… This is the absolute king of wraps for me. I’ve tried a lot, churned a lot, worn a lot in my 3.5 year wrapping journey and for me, this wrap really does it all. It’s solidly medium thickness in hand and fared well in both summer and winter weather. The support, cush and stretch mean an easy, tight, super comfy wrap job every time. I have a size 7, which is actually more wrap than I usually like to tangle with, but given how easy it is to wrap with, I’m just enjoying the nice long swishy tails! It’s just amazing — molds right to both me and baby (well, toddler at 18mo). Although I’ve seen others mention that it needed breaking in, I found it pretty soft from the get-go (although it has gotten even more so). If I put aside all sentiment for my other wraps and carriers, this could easily be my one-and-only from birth to toddler.

My only complaint is that it lulled me into thinking that all sea island cotton blends would be equally miraculous, so I overspent on another SIC wrap from another wildly popular maker and it was decidedly not love. It wasn’t even like… but that’s a lesson learned and another post for another day!

Read more about Oscha Sea Island cotton here.

Benefits of Babywearing- A Dad’s Point of View

Ciaran McKenna, AKA The Babywearing Dad, talks about why he enjoys carrying his first son in a sling and why he would recommend other fathers  do the same. Ciaran will be this years Face of the Fair at Babywearing Irelands annual Wear a Hug Fair.
Ciaran also reviewed our Starry Night Midnight wrap recently (pictured below), read what he thought here.

Ciaran-Image

I am a first time dad, like all first time dads I had no idea how this was going to go. I didn’t know what kind of a father I would be. Without babywearing I think things would be very different. I didn’t wear him for the first 6 weeks, mainly because I thought I might break him! I know now that that’s nonsense, and the next time round in will do it as soon as the baby is handed to me! In the run up to the Wear a Hug Fair I’d like to talk about some benefits of babywearing for any dads out there that might have their doubts about it. Don’t forget you can always contact me on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram if you’ve got any questions. I’m always more than happy to talk about my love of babywearing!

1. Bonding

Anyone who has read a few of my blog pieces or interviews knows that this is always a big one for me. It can seem to some dads that mom can bond faster than dad, and why wouldn’t they? They could have just carried the little one for 39ish weeks! The best way to bond, in my opinion, is babywearing. Having your baby so close to you, sleeping on you, getting used to your voice, your smell, your heartbeat. You can also do skin to skin, or kangaroo parenting while babywearing, which is a great way to bond too.

2.  Hands Free Parenting

I honestly don’t know how parents who don’t babywear get anything done! Feeding/walking the dogs, hanging out washing, stuffing nappies, making lunch, playing Xbox, all these and more are done in our house whilst babywearing. It’s so practical, and your baby is happy and contented the entire time (often asleep!)

3. Sharing Hobbies/Experiences

When babywearing you can really go pretty much anywhere. There’s no clunky buggy stopping you get in or up places and you are hands free. I’ve done some hillwalking, hiking, collecting plants for college work and changed the spark plugs on my bike with my little fella strapped to me. He was delighted and I got to continue doing things I like while still parenting and having my baby close to me. This also gives Mom a well deserved break which earns major brownie points; another benefit for dad!

4. Settles Babies Quickly

I have yet to find any way to soothe or calm my baby as quickly and easily as babywearing. Even my mom wears him now when she minds him! It’s unbelievable, and no matter what’s wrong it always helps, be it the position he’s in giving him relief from wind etc. or just the close cuddle giving him comfort, it has yet to fail. Every morning now for nap time he goes in a wrap for 10 minutes and he’s out like a light, and can be transferred to his cot (if I don’t want to just sit there cuddling him). Happy baby makes for a happy dad, and that time in the cot gets you a break for a cup of tea, or making bottles!

5. Impress Your Lady!

There isn’t a babywearing mom out there that doesn’t find their partner wearing their baby extremely attractive! I don’t know exactly what it is, but I haven’t met one woman who doesn’t love it!

Ciaran will be at the Wear a Hug Fair this weekend in Kildare, Ireland. Why not pop along to say hello if you’re near by.

Libero Aestus Review

flat-1

We asked Hedwych at Wrap You In Love to review our new 55% Organic Combed Cotton and 45% Pure Merino Wool blend. Hedwych has been using slings to carry and care for her children over the past four years and is an experienced wrapper. Her website has many ‘How to Videos’ and woven wrap reviews, she has created a fantastic resource for those who are interested in babywearing.

Hedwych was pregrant during her review of Liberty Aestus and has written a great blog post about pregancy and babywearing. She has recently given birth to her third little one, congratulations Hedwych!

pegnant-big

Hedwych carrying her daughter whist pregnant with her third child.

We wove this wooly blend in our newly revised Liberty Pattern ‘Libero’. You can also read her review on Wrap You In Love here.

The review: This design was new to me… Well, not really ‘new’ because it’s the Liberty design, but they enlarged the scale and rotated it.
Great idea in my opinion!
I have reviewed Liberty Lucy a while ago, back then I prefered the Nouveau pattern but now I actually think I like this best!

I had been in contact with Oscha because of some questions about materials/yarns they use and when they asked me to review this (new) blend I was very excited.
Organic cotton? Pure merino wool? Must be very soft!
I have to admit, when the wrap arrived I was a bit disappointed at first. It felt a bit prickly and not very inviting. Not as soft as the merino blends I’ve wrapped with before….
After a wash it was much better, still not as soft as I would like but I knew it would get better after wearing so I had to give it a try.

I tried it in a simple rucksack (tibetan), aiming for ‘just’ a quick up…. but: wow! When wrapping it didn’t have that itchy or scratchy feeling at all!
It’s very supportive, has great cush, less bounce compared to other merino wraps I’ve tried and it’s great for toddlers in a single layer carry!
I’m not sensitive to wool at all, so I find it hard to tell if someone else would experience it as a scratchy/itchy wrap when wearing it on bare skin.
I had no problem with it being itchy on my skin when wearing and my little girl seemed very happy too. I think with more wearing/washing it will feel less scratchy to the touch and get very soft. I can imagine wrapping a newborn with this wrap after a short breaking in period.

sleeping-big

Hedwych has tied a simple Rucksack (Tibetan) to carry her daughter on her back.

Not everyone loves (merino) wool in summer, but wool is known for not only insulating but it’s also very breathable (depending on the weave/thickness of the wrap of course).
They say it can keep the wearer cool and fresh in warm climates. Google also tells me that merino wool offers a natural UV protection, that sounds great! (but I can’t guarantee it… doctor Google isn’t always right).

The yarn has a bit of a ‘raw’ look, with some irregularities (but no real slubs and nubs). I really love both the ‘wrong’ and the ‘right’ side of this wrap.

This wrap has a width of 71cm, which is wider than my average wrap and great for bigger children without being overwhelming for a little baby.
I think this could make a great shorty, but a slipknot might be a bit bulky. It shines in single layer carries, with great cush and little bounce.

The wrap has a nice grip, you can do a knotless finish and it will stay put for ages. It isn’t overly grippy though. I was expecting (because of the ‘raw’ look of the yarn) a more grippy wrap, hard to wrap with… but it’s actually surprisingly moldable and easy to wrap with. It’s a good choice for both newbie wrappers as well as more experienced babywearers.
The cush makes it a forgiving wrap (still comfortable in a sloppy carry!) and I think experienced babywearers will like this blend too.

Stay away from this wrap if you have a sensitive skin, or if your little one is sensitive for wool. If you find other wool wraps (very) itchy you will probably experience this one that way too.
It does get better after wearing/washing and I loved it even on bare skin, but as I’ve said before I’m not sensitive to wool at all so can’t speak for those who are.

This is a boutique item where only 7 wraps were made. We will list these on our website on Friday 14th of August 2015 and will weave more wraps in this blend in the future.

Sea Island Cotton

We have sourced the most luxurious cotton for a new series of Boutique woven wraps.

 

JK-Zen

Hand picked and cultivated exclusively in the British West Indies, Sea Island cotton has unique qualities due to its long fibers which give a wonderful silken sheen and outstanding strength. Certified by The West Indian Sea Island Cotton Association, each sling will come with a hologram logo, guaranteeing the quality of this rare material. Blended with hemp, organic cotton, wild silk or cashmere weft yarns, look out for some Oscha Classics popping up soon.

Research Into The Benefits of Babywearing

Zoe and Vicki recently attended the Flemish Babywearing Conference in Antwerp and were fascinated to hear about current research exploring the benefits of babywearing. Here they share a personal view of what resonated for them.

head-image-2

 

When you’re working every day designing and making baby wraps it’s great to take time out to be reminded of the difference that baby wearing can make for babies, their parents and carers. After attending this two day conference and hearing about the growing evidence base demonstrating the benefits of baby wearing we returned with a renewed enthusiasm for the work we do. Here’s a brief foray into some of the things we learned.

Professor Reinhard Graf, an Orthopaedic Consultant from Austria was first up. Ebullient in his bow tie, he talked passionately about hip development of new born babies and what can cause developmental dislocation of the hips, otherwise known as hip dysplasia.

Many communities swaddle babies tightly from birth so the baby can be kept warm and safe, as well as easily transported over long distances and difficult terrain. Unfortunately tightly swaddling babies and wrapping them on carrier boards can lead to developmental dislocation of the hips. Essentially, it’s not healthy for babies to be forced into extending their legs for long periods of time; they need to be carried in a more natural position, with their knees tucked up. Reinhard told us that where communities had moved away from tight swaddling, to allow the baby to be carried with bent legs then the incidence of hip dysplasia reduced dramatically. Baby wearing, where the baby is correctly positioned to support flexion of the hips, can help both in preventing and addressing developmental dislocation of the hips.

m-shape

Showing the flexed ‘M’ shape of the babies hips and knees when carried in a woven wrap.

Both with animals and humans the baby naturally clings onto the parent with their legs bent and apart and so resting on the mother’s hip. Dr Evelin Kirkillonis talked of three different sub-categories of mammals differentiating between altricial such as cats and rats which need care and attention after birth for a period of time, precocial such as horses, elephants which are born, licked clean, nudged to stand up and off they go to find some food and finally the parent-clinging. Human babies, like apes and kangaroos, are ‘clinging young’ as Evelin called it, and need the closeness to the mother/parents for secure attachment as well as for food and safety.

Touch between parent and child, another key aspect of wrapping, also helps the production of oxytocin. This really does seem to be the wonder hormone, stimulating good cell growth, inhibiting cancer growing cells and killing cells that are not functional. It’s produced everywhere in the body; heart, cells, gastro-intestinal tract, skin, brain leading to a connective web, all influencing one another as Professor Kerstin Unvas-Moberg, who has published a number of books on oxytocin, told us.

As well as being key in the production of breast milk, when oxytocin is released it reduces anxiety, blood pressure, heart rate, pain and leads to weight loss in men. It increases social interaction, curiosity, growth and restoration, wound healing and weight gain in women (oh well, nothing’s perfect).

Skin to skin contact is key in the release of oxytocin and creating attachment between parents and baby. So it’s critical that parents have the opportunity to touch as soon as possible after the baby’s born, and of course baby wearing creates close up touch between child and parent.

touch

Babies carried close enjoy plenty of instinctive, positive touch.

The importance of skin to skin was also the theme of the presentation given by Tina Hoffmann. She talked movingly of a project, which Didymos were involved in, to design a wrap for carrying premature babies.  This was a subject close to our hearts as Zoe’s twins were premature. It certainly would have been great to have the enlightened team of midwife and consultant, whom Tina worked with around instead of the general ignorance of and resistance to kangaroo care we encountered. However, things have moved on in six years and there is more awareness of the benefits of kangaroo care now.

The wraps Didymos designed hold the baby securely against the parent so they can relax and even lie back and drift off without fear of baby slipping. They are soft yet stretchy allowing easy access for the nurses in case they need to quickly remove the baby and are simple, so tubes won’t get entangled.  Tina said they found fathers initially reluctant to wear their babies but having been persuaded once they were invariably keen to continue.

In between workshops we enjoyed catching up with babywearing consultants and healthcare professions attending the conference, and hanging out with our friends at Connecta, as well as meeting people from other wrap companies. We, somehow, still found time to explore the beautiful old town centre in Antwerp, window shop for jewellery and stock up on Belgian chocolate.

All in all it was a great two days and we’d like to thank the conference organisers for a seamless event and all the speakers, most of whom were presenting in English, which was not their first language – much respect.

How to Choose a Sling for Summer

What are the best slings for the heat?”- This is a question we get asked all the time as the weather begins to warm up so we’ve put together a guide with tips for baby carrying in the heat and to help you choose the right Oscha Sling for you & your little one this summer.
Type of Sling & Fabric Weight

We suggest choosing a sling in a lighter weight fabric, especially if you wish to wrap multi-layer carries. You could also consider using a slightly thicker wrap for single layer carries, particularly if you are carrying an older child who wants to be up and down a lot, and if you prefer more ‘cush’ on the shoulders. We suggest something between 180 and 260gsm.

While wraps offer a lot of versatility, ring slings are another great choice as they offer a single layer carry, covering less of your body while allowing air to circulate. Also, the long tail can be to cover little legs, or your shoulders, from the sun!

Continue reading

Oscha Handwoven – Exploring the Craft

Cally Booker, handweaver, shares what weaving means to her and talks about her new experience of weaving cloth for baby slings.

Image of Leaves Iridescence, handwoven baby wrap by Cally Booker

Leaves Iridescence, handwoven baby wrap by Cally Booker

Last year we began to work with Cally Booker, a very experienced handweaver who brings incredible skill, knowledge and creativity to her craft. Each season Cally has woven a new pattern for us, developing colourways that match the energy of the season. Each time Cally weaves only enough fabric for about 3 Boutique slings.

Cally lives in the east coast of Scotland and also teaches classes in hand weaving from her studio. We have been enjoying working together to develop fabric suitable for baby wraps. There is something special about carrying your child in unique, lovingly woven fabric. From the initial stages of the design and throughout the process of weaving the warp and weft together, Cally will put her heart and soul into the cloth,

‘During the process of warping and weaving, every individual thread passes through my fingers. It still seems extraordinary to me that I can take yarn between my fingers and turn it into cloth’.

warping-up

This image shows the warping up process of the yarn onto the loom before the weaving of the cloth begins. This warp is the Folklorico colourway.

Where did you train?

I studied handwoven textile design at Bradford College from 2005-2007.

How many years have you been weaving?

I first started weaving quite by accident 11 years ago. I fell in love with the craft and went straight back to school to study while still working full time in a challenging job. It was a rather crazy time.

Where do you begin to look for inspiration?

Inspiration can come from anywhere. It might be a word, an image, a concept, a yarn that starts the ideas flowing, but once I am in the grip of an idea I can become quite obsessed with it until I have seen the work to completion.

Does your design develop as you begin to weave, do you produce many samples before coming up with a final design?

Sampling is my middle name. Although I sketch out my ideas on paper and then design weaving drafts on my computer, it is only when I am at the loom that they really come to life for me. The process of sampling often yields surprises and takes the work in a different direction from my carefully worked out plan!

Is there anything particularly challenging about weaving fabric for baby slings?

For me the biggest challenge is the constraint imposed by my loom. I have to use my wide countermarche loom to achieve the dimensions needed, but it has only 8 shafts. I have to work hard on the design to get the most out of those 8 shafts.

How long does it take to weave a metre of your fabric?

It takes about 2 hours to weave a meter, but the really slow part is making a 20 metre warp of 1500 ends and getting it onto the loom in the first place! This process is extremely variable and the threading (bringing the warp ends through the heddles) often takes a full day to complete. However, it is also my favorite part, so I am not complaining.

Maypole handwoven wrap in progress on the loom.

Maypole handwoven wrap in progress on the loom.

 What do you feel you personally bring to the world of handwoven wraps?

I think that what most people notice first in my work is my slightly unconventional colour sense. It’s a sense that works well for fabric which moves and curves like a wrap does, so I guess that is what I am bringing.

The most recent handwoven wraps crafted for us by Cally is ‘Leaves Iridescence’ shown below. Cally has given us some insight into the weave structure and the process.

Detail image of the weave structure in Leaves Iridescence.

Detail image of the weave structure in Leaves Iridescence.

‘The secret behind the interactions of colour and pattern in this fabric is a technique called ‘echo weave’. In this structure two layers of warp are threaded together, one ‘echoing’ the other. These two warps are bound together with a single weft, and the three yarns blend together in different proportions as the pattern progresses: the results are often surprising, even to the weaver!’
‘The two warp layers mean that this is a dense cloth, so a relatively fine yarn is needed to keep it from becoming too heavy. I use an organic 16/2 cotton, which is lovely to work with.
The basic structure underlying this weave is a twill, which gives the fabric its beautiful drape, but I’m drawn to large scale patterns so I use networked threadings to make each design as bold as my loom will allow. For me as a handweaver, much of the pleasure – and the challenge! – comes from getting as much ‘pattern power’ as I can from simple 8-shaft loom.’

The first Oscha Handwoven by Cally was ‘Maypole Spring’, which was released in Spring 2014. Taking inspiration from the winding and shaping of ribbons, the colours reflect the light and liveliness of spring.

Image of Finished handwoven Maypole Spring Baby Wrap

Finished handwoven Maypole Spring Baby Wrap

‘Folklorico’ was Callys second Oscha hand woven and was Inspired by the Mexican Baile ‘Folklorico’, the pattern is a simple scallop-shape which progresses across the width of the cloth to give it a sense of movement. The vivid colours and shaping thus reflect the lively dancers skirts.

Finished Folklorico Jalisco handwoven baby wrap.

Finished Folklorico Jalisco handwoven baby wrap.

Each season, since spring 2014, we have presented a new creation from Cally, with between 2 and 4 limited edition wraps being available on each occasion, making for a very special, treasured piece. Keep your eyes peeled for the next hand crafted gem on the way.

You can view Cally’s blog and Twitter feed here:

Blog: callybooker.co.uk
Twitter feed: @bonnyclaith

 

To see the full range and more images of Cally’s creations, visit our website here.

Bamboo for bigger kids too!

When a new wrapper asks about bamboo they will generally be told ‘its lovely for squishes but won’t work for bigger kids’, in fact there’s many qualities in Oscha bamboo that make it ideal for carrying even pre-schoolers.

Yun Yi wearing her 3 and a half year old son in Zhuzi Ash.

Yun Yi wearing her three and a half year old son in Zhuzi Ash.

It is true that a thicker fabric especially one that is densely woven, will tend to perform better in a single layer carry, but there’s a point where your child gets so heavy that a single layer carry, except in the thickest of sturdy fabrics, is not going to cut it anymore. There’s a few wrappers out there with hardy shoulders who can manage, but for most, more than about half an hour with a 3 year old in a single layer carry will cause achy shoulders.

Image of Nina wearing Nouveau Nebula Baby Wrap (46% Bamboo, 54% Cotton)

Nouveau Nebula Baby Wrap (46% Bamboo, 54% Cotton)

 

At this point most people will need to use multi-layer carries for periods of long carrying anyway, and this is when bamboo really comes in to its own. Oscha bamboo is also very strong, we use a fine thread that is densely woven. Thin wraps that are densely woven can offer great support, it is those that have a looser weave that tend to sag (although this can be worth it when the weather is very hot to allow more air flow).

 

Oscha Bamboo is very soft and has an incredible glide, this means that a very snug wrap job can be achieved effortlessly; passes are easy to tighten and adjust. Some people complain that bamboo is too slippery, but to get a good wrap job in a complicated carry that requires a lot of tightening, like a double hammock or DRS2S it can be perfect. As it is not too thick it also adds to the ease of wrapping and makes it a good all year rounder. Personally I enjoyed using it as a summer-time wrap in Scotland too.

Ambit Natalis Solice Wrap, (46% Bamboo, 56% Cotton)

Ambit Natalis Solice Wrap, (46% Bamboo, 56% Cotton)

 

Ultimately its all down to personal preference, but from one person who carried 4 year old twins (one at a time!) for an hour’s walk each day in total comfort, and found Oscha bamboo a joy to wrap with, I can vouch for bamboo for big kids!

 

Bamboo also has other great qualities as a baby sling. It offers natural UV protection, is anti-bacterial, great for those with sensitive skin. Bamboo is naturally moisture wicking & breathable, and the fabric has a beautiful shimmer. 

 

Here is a review  from Yun of Zhuzi Ash, 46% Bamboo, 54% Combed Cotton. She talks about using this wrap with her two children, her daughter who is 12 months and her son of three and a half years.  To see the original review, click here.

 

I didn’t know what to expect when I received this wrap, but the rich evergreen and bright bamboo green colours and the intricate bamboo design blew me away. Then, I touched it….and it was so soft…yet it felt so strong…I could not wait to wrap with it.

 

Zhuzi Ash wrap (46% Bamboo, 56% Combed Cotton)

Zhuzi Ash wrap (46% Bamboo, 56% Combed Cotton)

One wash and this wrap became floppy as if it was pretending to be a wrap that had been with me forever. The texture is silky, smooth, and incredibly soft – did I say that yet? I mean, I could not get over the softness. It’s also narrower than some other Oscha wraps. I was concerned though, as a soft wrap like this could not be supportive could it?? But I read up on the qualities of bamboo, its sustainability, how strong, and versatile this plant fiber can be. But I had also read that people said it could be saggy. So up it went with my little 1 year old and it was perfect.

 

This is a soft and moldable wrap with a glide that some will call slippery but with deliberate wrapping you can get it to stick just perfectly so that it stays put and that’s when you realize how supportive and dense this wrap can feel. I had to lower my daughter so she could nurse and it still stayed in place but when I wanted to bring her back up I had to rewrap a bit more since I had lost the tension that had allowed it to feel so supportive. It seems to have a slight cush to it – maybe due to the textile weaving intricacy of the bamboo throughout the wrap?? Or is is the bamboo itself??

 

The big test came with my three and a half year old. At a bit over 30lbs, he needed precise wrapping to make sure that he didn’t make the wrap slip down but once again as long as I made sure to be deliberate and guide the rails into place, my big child did not sag or slip down. He was snug as a bug and the wrap remained supportive. Overall, for a small baby, wrapping this narrow, soft and slightly slippier wrap will be easy and on a larger child wrapping has to be deliberate and precise but all in all shows the stretch of bamboo and the versatility of it as an incredibly silky feeling wrap. The artistry of Oscha really shines in this wrap and I can’t wait to use it more since V gets to be a big sister this fall.

 

To view the full range of Oscha Bamboo wraps, click here.

Creating the Northern Isles Collection

Images of Okinami Orkney, inspired by the Scottish landscape at dawn.

Okinami Orkney, inspired by modern artworks depicting seascapes at dawn on the Northern Isles of Scotland.

I had returned to the family home, a log cabin in Fife, where Mike spends most of his time working on Oscha designs (amongst other things!). We had decided we wished to create a sunset fade of colours specifically for weaving with Okinami. We spent a long time playing about with colours and built a very bright sunset scene, but neither of us were feeling particularly satisfied about it. It felt too close to our Hawaii sunset warp, with a tropical look.

 

We both decided to take a break and accompany the rest of the family for a visit to the annual Pittenweem Arts Festival. This village in the East Neuk of Fife comes alive with the Scottish art scene for one week in August, when you can find tiny little pop-up galleries emerge everywhere, from resident’s front rooms and garages to tents in the gardens!

 

Whilst we wandered in and out of the tiny make-shift galleries, many filled with paintings of Scottish seascapes, and along the sea front which the village clings to, a new pallet of colours began to emerge. On our return we decided that it was at last time to begin the Northern Isles Collection, we used images of fine & modern artworks depicting seascapes, and more subtle yet radiant dawn light, in the Northern Isles to build a fade of colours that felt both more mature and interesting.

Okinami Orkney, showing the dawn warp colour way.

Okinami Orkney, showing the dawn warp.

The Northern Lights, or Merry Dancers warp came simply through the fun of playing with our new multi-colour warp technology. We hit on the lively range of colours and were reminded of the Northern Lights.

 

Shortly afterwards I went to a local Fèis, where young musicians from up North played and sang beautiful, traditional folk music, and there was a cèilidh. This brought to mind a competition entrant who had suggested a Collection theme to us – ‘the Merrie Dancers’ – which is the local term in Orkney and Shetland for the aurora borealis. I could immediately see a parallel between the music, dance and the movement of the local Gaelic music scene and the vivid lights in the night sky, which are so visible in the Northern Isles.

Image of Tjimkje playing the fiddle in the Eire Fairy Ring wrap.

Tjimkje playing the fiddle in an Eire Fairy Ring wrap. Bringing together the Northern Lights warp with folk music and dance.

Pulling these two warps together we felt we had a nice beginning to the new collection and in time we hope to come back, adding a Part 2, with more Shetland-inspired colours and designs.

 

To shop the collection, click here.