Monthly Archives: June 2016

What’s The Difference? Coorie & Cairis Carriers

Lots of our customers have been asking about some of the differences between the Coorie and Cairis carriers. Below is a comparison of the unique elements to each carrier.

Both carriers have been inspired by the traditional Mei-Tai. The main difference between them is the waist belt and shoulder straps. The Cairis has a padded waist belt with a buckle fastening and padded shoulder straps. The Coorie has a pleated waist belt with a ring fastening and carefully pleated shoulder straps with light padding. Both Carriers have been hand crafted in Scotland by highly skilled seamstresses. Read on for more details and info to help you choose.

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Coorie on the left. Cairis on the right

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Coorie on Tourie & New System to Purchase

In preparation of our new listing system for selling our Coories, we decided to send it on tour! See below for some feedback from the families who had a go, and read on to find out what’s new and how you can purchase one of your own.

What’s New?

We’ve made a few tweaks to the Coorie body panel after receiving feedback from customers.
Previous Dimensions:
Baby Panel: 38cm (15″) wide (at base) x 41cm (16″) high.
Toddler Panel: 50cm (19.5″) wide (at base) x 42cm (16.5″) high.

New Dimensions:
Baby Panel: 44cm (17.5″) wide (at base) x 28cm (15″) high.
Toddler Panel: 49.5cm (19.5″) wide x 43cm (17″) high.

We’ve replaced the buttons for the hood with a simple tie so that you can still roll it up, creating that stylish look and holding it in place with ease.

How To Buy:

1. The Coorie will be made to order from specific Oscha fabric which will be previewed on Facebook before the ‘slots’ become available.

2. We will state how many slots will be available (approx. 2- 6 for each style) and time of the listing, so that you can purchase your slot on the website when they go live.

3. Prices: Baby £268 | Toddler £279

4. We will aim to ship orders within 2 weeks of the purchase date.

5. Our aim is to have approximately 2 listings each month with different Oscha fabric.

As always, our Coorie carriers will be handmade in our workshop in Scotland by our team of highly skilled seamstresses.

What’s Coming Up?
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Collaboration with Artist Elizabeth Close

We are delighted to have had the opportunity to collaborate with Anangu artist Elizabeth Close on a new design – Skipping Stones. Elizabeth creates contemporary & traditional Australian Aboriginal Art inspired by her surroundings and heritage. Elizabeth’s strong connections with the babywearing community has made this process and the final result even more touching for us. Read Zoe’s interview with Elizabeth below to hear more about how she became an artist, her influences and what inspired this particular pattern.
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Skipping stones has been woven on the ‘Surf’ Warp (from our Oceania collection) and will make at least one more appearance this year.

Firstly we’d like to say how delighted we are to have this opportunity to work with you after being such a fan of your artwork! Can you tell us a bit about how you became an artist?

Hi Zoe! It’s exciting for me too! Thanks so much for approaching me! I’m not wearing as much as I used to now that my smallest is an independent being that wants to walk and run, so it’s lovely to still be involved in the community I love so much. I do however have my third baby on the way, so I look forward to wearing my babies for years to come.

Motherhood

Elizabeths painting inspired by motherhood and an image of her carrying her child in an Oscha Woven wrap she designed for the Australian Babywearing Conference in 2015.

In some ways, I’ve always been an artist.  As I moved into high school, I didn’t enjoy art classes because I found it so constricting. They wanted me to learn about light and shade and study the work of other artists – and all I wanted to do was paint my own things in my own style! So I gave it up at year 10. I’ve always kind of dabbled in my own projects, and I continued to dabble as I became an adult, doing some works on canvas.

“My grandmother, my single most important link to my culture, used to teach me to paint and draw – she was very creative.”

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